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Author Topic: Kelp  (Read 1675 times)

Offline maodiver

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Kelp
« on: July 22, 2016, 07:55:56 PM »
Kelp beds are doing pretty well off San Luis Obispo county, from north of Cayucos to Pismo.  Don't know what is screwing up the kelp up north, but temp?  Doubtful.  And I really don't think urchins are it, either.
Dad, what's for dinner?

Wookie steaks

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Ehhh, they're a little Chewy.

Offline Joshua R.

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Re: Kelp
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2016, 11:37:40 AM »
It's a different species. Giant kelpis what you see in the south, bull kelp in the north. There are spots of both species in the north and south. Giant kelp has foliage all the way down the stalk, bull kelp has long strands from the hold fast with all the foliage on the surface.

Offline Duckfoot

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Re: Kelp
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2016, 06:44:08 PM »
Kelp beds are doing pretty well off San Luis Obispo county, from north of Cayucos to Pismo.  Don't know what is screwing up the kelp up north, but temp?  Doubtful.  And I really don't think urchins are it, either.

The urchins are the greatest reason the kelp is having a hard time. Most researchers believe high ocean temperatures are associated with the disease that wiped out the sea stars which allowed the urchins to go unchecked. The DFW estimates urchin populations are 60 times normal and urchins eat kelp. There you have it. But there are a number of researchers that don't believe temperatures are the reason behind the sea star die-off because there was a large die-off in Washington state where temperatures were normal.  Experiments have proven that the pathogen which killed the sea stars is more deadly in warmer water, so while high temps have been proven to hasten transmission, does it mean high temps are the reason behind the die-off? Some researchers are saying, not so fast. In some of the first reports about the die-off, researchers speculated sea stars were over populated and a natural "correction" was going to happen one way or another.

Abalone populations, even in areas now off limits to hunting due to low "fishery" density, have higher densities than found in more natural (pre-European) environments. In other words, even with all the concern, abalone are currently overpopulated. Is what we're seeing in areas where abalone are showing stress, like researchers originally speculated with sea stars, a natural "correction"? We aren't likely to find out because there's been no research regarding the potential effects of abalone overpopulation, even though it exists. It's speculation on my part but I have to wonder if that has to do with fishery biologists being in charge of management as opposed to marine ecologists. Regardless - if the department doesn't have data to act on, they can't, or won't, act. In the meantime the department is developing their FMP without any information regarding potential consequences of overpopulation. With limited resources the department is going to work on what they see as the larger problem - a changing environment. Unfortunately that translates to a continued lack of understanding regarding the role abalone overpopulation may be playing even though overpopulation may exacerbate problems brought on by climate change. 
« Last Edit: July 24, 2016, 08:04:41 PM by Duckfoot »
If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.  –Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Offline gsharp

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Re: Kelp
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2016, 07:37:05 PM »
It's speculation on my part but I have to wonder if that has to do with fishery biologists being in charge of management as opposed to marine ecologists.

Thank you for making this point, Jack.
Glen Sharp

Offline Duckfoot

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Re: Kelp
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2016, 12:46:35 AM »
Thanks, Glen.
Here's a taste as to why we should be paying attention to the difference:

"So what makes us fully fledged marine ecologist different from our biologist counterparts?  Well, I think that marine ecology is even cooler than marine biology because as marine ecologists we link what we know about the biology of a given species with other plants/animals and the environment as well."

https://marineecologist.wordpress.com/2013/01/22/marine-ecology-or-marine-biology-whats-the-difference/
« Last Edit: July 27, 2016, 01:04:20 AM by Duckfoot »
If you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect wood and don't assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.  –Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

 

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