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Author Topic: mycological noob here  (Read 1937 times)

Offline Alex C.

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mycological noob here
« on: November 16, 2014, 11:28:11 PM »
hey guys,

Alex here! I'm fully invested in spearfishing and free diving, I feel like its time that i broaden my horizons a bit and give mushroom hunting a try. I currently live in Ventura, in southern california, however i frequent my home town where i was born and raised in Napa.

I have a small understanding of mycorhizal fungi used as a symbiotic relationship for giant pumpkins, we are starting to delve into the use of different strains of fungi at different stages of the giants' life like azospirillium.

Now its time i get a better understanding of the identification and conditions to look for when it comes to edible mushrooms. if anyone could direct me to a source so i can start learning the ID, that would be awesome! IF someone wouldn't mind me tagging along with them, that would be cool too!

Alex C.

Offline chopper

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Re: mycological noob here
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2014, 09:46:22 AM »
MD is great but I'd also get his All that the Rain Promises as a field guide -- the flow chart inside the covers is one of the best guides for a beginner and it references the pages in MD.

First two books here: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_14?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=all%20that%20the%20rain%20promises%20and%20more&sprefix=all+that+the+r%2Caps%2C297

Online lazyhook

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Re: mycological noob here
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2014, 10:04:41 AM »
randyrhoads' comments are all good, and I pretty much agree with them.

"Mushrooms Demystified" (frequently just referenced as "MD" by mycofiles) can be quite dense, especially for beginners.

David Aurora's smaller book, "All That the Rain Promises and More: A Hip Pocket Guide to Western Mushrooms" might be a better starting point.  The smaller book is also about 1/3 of the price.   I've got about a dozen different mushroom books, and it's still the one I reference the most.  David claims that he's in the process of updating/revising both, but he's been saying that for several years. 

http://www.amazon.com/All-That-Rain-Promises-More/dp/0898153883/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1416246064&sr=8-2&keywords=mushrooms+demystified+by+david+arora

Quite a bit of the research and writing on mushrooms is done by Bay Area locals, so it's not unusual to actually run into the experts at various clubs and forays.  Especially, since there are a number of mycology programs at SF State, Berkeley, and Davis in addition to the large number of clubs and associations.  Another book that looks potentially interesting is a new one being released next month by Dennis Desjardin from SF State.  "California Mushrooms"

http://www.amazon.com/California-Mushrooms-Dennis-E-Desjardin/dp/1604693533/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1416246176&sr=8-1&keywords=california+mushroom&pebp=1416246179778

Offline Alex C.

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Re: mycological noob here
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2014, 02:07:43 PM »
Awesome guys! Thank you so much! I don't mind a bit of dense reading. I am interested in mycology not only as a source of food but getting into the taxonomy of fungi interests me as well. I'm studying biology at CSU Channel Islands and I'm coming up on my 4th year. So this (basic mycology and symbiosis) is an option for a senior thesis if it gets approved within my major (Environmental Science)
Alex C.

Offline Alex C.

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Re: mycological noob here
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2014, 05:46:09 PM »
an annual fungus fair! sounds like my kind of place!

in all seriousness, thanks for highlighting the danger involved, i recently watched a vid where some guy talks about the difference between death caps and candy caps. pretty crazy!

I hope to be tagging along with a handful of people before i dive deep into harvesting fruit by myself!
Alex C.

 

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