General Discussion > The Kayak section

First yak advice needed

(1/5) > >>

Twid:
What’s up everyone? I’m interested in buying my first kayak, but I have known idea what I’m looking for. I know I would use it for fishing in the SF Bay Area, dropping crab traps and diving off our coast. Any information or suggestions would be awesome. What you you all recommend? I don’t want anything cheep and I’m not opposed of buying used.

P.s. don’t tell my chick I don’t want her cutting my body off my manhood.

WFO
Twid

ryang85:

--- Quote from: Twid on April 01, 2018, 05:42:25 PM ---What’s up everyone? I’m interested in buying my first kayak, but I have known idea what I’m looking for. I know I would use it for fishing in the SF Bay Area, dropping crab traps and diving off our coast. Any information or suggestions would be awesome. What you you all recommend? I don’t want anything cheep and I’m not opposed of buying used.

P.s. don’t tell my chick I don’t want her cutting my body off my manhood.

WFO
Twid

--- End quote ---
Tons of post on here already you should sort through with the search.
But all i can say is there is a kayak for every person.  Weight is a huge issue on newer kayaks.  Generaly for diving you want a long, narrow kayak that paddles and tracks well while stability is less important. But that is for you to decide. I have a trident ultra 4.3  that i got off ebay for cheep and I really like it, other than it is a little on the heavier side but still  plenty manageable.   

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

DG:
I think the first time I dove with Ryan he had a hollowed out log with 5 gallon bucket lids for paddles.  So he can say stability is not an issue.  I really prefer not felling like I am going to roll right into the ocean all day even if my intent is to dive in. 

I have paddled and pedaled several different kayaks but do think most people who really get into it end up with numerous kayaks so as long as you like the features and size just go for it.  Most often when Diving with others I see, Hobies, wilderness systems, ocean kayaks or Jackson kayaks.  So any of them should be a good start.  At least better than a Walmart or Costco kayak.  If you think you want something different later then you can always keep the first one for a spare or loaner or sell it and put the money towards a new one. 

Good luck trying to decide. 

ryang85:

--- Quote from: DG on April 01, 2018, 09:37:29 PM ---I think the first time I dove with Ryan he had a hollowed out log with 5 gallon bucket lids for paddles.  So he can say stability is not an issue.  I really prefer not felling like I am going to roll right into the ocean all day even if my intent is to dive in. 

I have paddled and pedaled several different kayaks but do think most people who really get into it end up with numerous kayaks so as long as you like the features and size just go for it.  Most often when Diving with others I see, Hobies, wilderness systems, ocean kayaks or Jackson kayaks.  So any of them should be a good start.  At least better than a Walmart or Costco kayak.  If you think you want something different later then you can always keep the first one for a spare or loaner or sell it and put the money towards a new one. 

Good luck trying to decide.

--- End quote ---
You can mock my scrambler all you want but in all of its glory it weighed 40 pounds at 11 feet and could surf launch 10 times better than an other kayak ive tried.
 
I mean derrek used a scupper that was equaly as vintage.   He was the only one who could beat me in the who has the most water inside the kayak game.


Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

Rob102:
I used to have a stable kayak. It was so slow and heavy. When I tried a narrower kayak I was clumsy but that only lasted a day or two.

Kayaks have a primary and secondary stability. Primary is what people refer to as stable, it is what eliminates the initial rock and roll which makes it feel tippy. Secondary is the actual stability that keeps you right side up. Kayaks will rock and feel tippy long before they will actually capsize. Once you get used to the primary stability or tippiness, you no longer notice it, so imo stability is a non-issue for a diver. However, if you are going to hnl fish or pack crab pots a wider platform may be appropriate.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

Go to full version