NorCal Underwater Hunters

NorCal Underwater Hunters Discussion => Hunting Gear => Topic started by: Kshang on September 04, 2019, 04:58:26 PM

Title: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Kshang on September 04, 2019, 04:58:26 PM
I've been using shafts with rock-point tips, the sharpening of which is fairly easy by rotating them on my angle grinder. 

I recently got a gun with a tri-cut tip (Rob Allen).  After a couple of days in the water, the tip starts to wear off.  I know lots of folks on this board use Rob Allen and Pathos guns, which I understand come with tri-cut tips.  Do you have a simple way of sharpening these tri-cut tips, or do you grind them into rock-point tips?  Seems to me that, to get decent sharpening of tri-cut tips, I will at least need to get myself a bench grinder, or better yet, belt sander, but I would rather not have another piece of equipment take up my garage space if there's a good alternative.  I thought about grinding it into a rock-point, but I do like the penetration of a tri-cut tip, so wanted to quickly check. 

Thanks in advance,
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Zzz on September 04, 2019, 05:38:32 PM
I clamp my angle grinder down to a plastic folding table and create a bench grinder! A legit bench grinder or belt sander would be more precise, but an angle grinder works with a little finesse. Tips don't need to be perfect for what we do
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: TimBekk on September 04, 2019, 05:59:18 PM
I file or grind to a pencil tip. Once it is a pencil tip I can keep sharp with a file between dives.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Kshang on September 04, 2019, 08:03:13 PM
Thanks.  I'll probably give it a try, though the idea of a fast spinning angle grinder slipping off my sawhorse makes me a bit uneasy. 

I clamp my angle grinder down to a plastic folding table and create a bench grinder! A legit bench grinder or belt sander would be more precise, but an angle grinder works with a little finesse. Tips don't need to be perfect for what we do
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Kshang on September 04, 2019, 08:04:09 PM
That's my backup plan, if I cannot keep the tri-cut in reasonably good shape. 

I file or grind to a pencil tip. Once it is a pencil tip I can keep sharp with a file between dives.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 04, 2019, 10:23:47 PM
Clamp it in a vise and use a bastard file. Sharpens like a razor.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: TheKeeneroo on September 05, 2019, 07:15:53 AM
I use a hand file on both pencil and tri cut tips. It's a bit more elbow grease and skinned knuckles, but it's easier than setting up my grinder on a folding table with clamps and such and I can do it on the side of the road before a dive.

One thing to keep in mind with grinders (from what I've read in the past) is how hot the shaft can get which alters the strength of the metal. You might keep a damp towel nearby and cool the metal down every few seconds. I'm sure someone that works with metal more than I do can chime in on the truth of this.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Amsmosh on September 05, 2019, 07:43:15 AM
I’m lazy I just use a bench grinder.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: pclark on September 05, 2019, 09:33:46 AM
I just use an handheld angle grinder and it works great, but a bench grinder would be better.  Just dont grind past the tri-cut as it will rust out anywhere you hit.   If its going to be more than a day until I use it I'll hit it with some spray paint to prevent the rust.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: MATT MATTISON on September 05, 2019, 02:30:09 PM
all I will say is do not over think it and and keep it "KIS"  keep it simple  like others have said bench grinder, angle grinder or hand file
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 05, 2019, 10:22:38 PM
I use a hand file on both pencil and tri cut tips. It's a bit more elbow grease and skinned knuckles, but it's easier than setting up my grinder on a folding table with clamps and such and I can do it on the side of the road before a dive.

One thing to keep in mind with grinders (from what I've read in the past) is how hot the shaft can get which alters the strength of the metal. You might keep a damp towel nearby and cool the metal down every few seconds. I'm sure someone that works with metal more than I do can chime in on the truth of this.

If using a grinder or belt sander or anything that can generate heat on that level, have at least a cup of water on hand to dip the tip into about every 2 seconds. A good spear shaft should be hardened and tempered so that it does not mushroom when it hits a rock, and does not shatter when it hits a rock. If you get it too hot while sharpening it you will anneal (soften) it to the point that it will mushroom or bend if you hit a rock. As bare steel heats up you will see that rainbow color develop. Yellow, Orange, purple, blue.. Any of those colors mean you got it too hot. Well, a little yellow might not be too hot, but best to avoid it as your spear should already be tempered to the perfect hardness. Also as the tip gets finer, it heats up A LOT faster so one second on a belt sander without quenching can over heat it. If you ever see a glowing dull red, Cut off the tip, quench it and start over.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: TheKeeneroo on September 06, 2019, 07:58:51 AM
I use a hand file on both pencil and tri cut tips. It's a bit more elbow grease and skinned knuckles, but it's easier than setting up my grinder on a folding table with clamps and such and I can do it on the side of the road before a dive.

One thing to keep in mind with grinders (from what I've read in the past) is how hot the shaft can get which alters the strength of the metal. You might keep a damp towel nearby and cool the metal down every few seconds. I'm sure someone that works with metal more than I do can chime in on the truth of this.

If using a grinder or belt sander or anything that can generate heat on that level, have at least a cup of water on hand to dip the tip into about every 2 seconds. A good spear shaft should be hardened and tempered so that it does not mushroom when it hits a rock, and does not shatter when it hits a rock. If you get it too hot while sharpening it you will anneal (soften) it to the point that it will mushroom or bend if you hit a rock. As bare steel heats up you will see that rainbow color develop. Yellow, Orange, purple, blue.. Any of those colors mean you got it too hot. Well, a little yellow might not be too hot, but best to avoid it as your spear should already be tempered to the perfect hardness. Also as the tip gets finer, it heats up A LOT faster so one second on a belt sander without quenching can over heat it. If you ever see a glowing dull red, Cut off the tip, quench it and start over.

I fully appreciate people smarter than me... which isn't too hard =P I knew there was some heating issues!
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 06, 2019, 08:23:32 PM
I use a hand file on both pencil and tri cut tips. It's a bit more elbow grease and skinned knuckles, but it's easier than setting up my grinder on a folding table with clamps and such and I can do it on the side of the road before a dive.

One thing to keep in mind with grinders (from what I've read in the past) is how hot the shaft can get which alters the strength of the metal. You might keep a damp towel nearby and cool the metal down every few seconds. I'm sure someone that works with metal more than I do can chime in on the truth of this.

If using a grinder or belt sander or anything that can generate heat on that level, have at least a cup of water on hand to dip the tip into about every 2 seconds. A good spear shaft should be hardened and tempered so that it does not mushroom when it hits a rock, and does not shatter when it hits a rock. If you get it too hot while sharpening it you will anneal (soften) it to the point that it will mushroom or bend if you hit a rock. As bare steel heats up you will see that rainbow color develop. Yellow, Orange, purple, blue.. Any of those colors mean you got it too hot. Well, a little yellow might not be too hot, but best to avoid it as your spear should already be tempered to the perfect hardness. Also as the tip gets finer, it heats up A LOT faster so one second on a belt sander without quenching can over heat it. If you ever see a glowing dull red, Cut off the tip, quench it and start over.

Which is exactly why I use a file.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: NateP on September 07, 2019, 08:58:44 AM
I don't have a bench grinder, but I do have a drill press.  I found this cheap grinder attachment on amazon (see pic) and it works pretty well.  I just brace the spear shaft on the drill press table and press one side of the tri-cut against the bottom of the grinder wheel, then rotate to sharpen the next face.  As Diver Dan mentioned, you have to quench frequently, I use ice water.  I also found that getting a very fine point is a waste of time, as it will disappear as soon as you get anywhere near a rock.  If you have a power tool, (especially one that is stationary), you may want to consider this as an alternative to buying a separate grinder.  I tried hand sharpening and maybe I didn't have the ideal file but it took forever.  This setup works for me.
(https://i.postimg.cc/Z9yZ5FZr/IMG-0277.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Z9yZ5FZr)
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 07, 2019, 10:31:34 AM
I don't have a bench grinder, but I do have a drill press.  I found this cheap grinder attachment on amazon (see pic) and it works pretty well.  I just brace the spear shaft on the drill press table and press one side of the tri-cut against the bottom of the grinder wheel, then rotate to sharpen the next face.  As Diver Dan mentioned, you have to quench frequently, I use ice water.  I also found that getting a very fine point is a waste of time, as it will disappear as soon as you get anywhere near a rock.  If you have a power tool, (especially one that is stationary), you may want to consider this as an alternative to buying a separate grinder.  I tried hand sharpening and maybe I didn't have the ideal file but it took forever.  This setup works for me.
(https://i.postimg.cc/Z9yZ5FZr/IMG-0277.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Z9yZ5FZr)

If you are getting the shaft hot and quenching with ice water you are more than likely changing the temper of the steel. Depending on the material, carbon steel, spring steel, etc. you will either harden the tip or make it brittle so that will never hold an edge if it hits a rock. RA shafts are carbon if I remember correctly and pathos are precipitation hardened spring steel and they should be quenched differently.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: NateP on September 07, 2019, 11:34:34 AM
Maybe I'm not using the term "quench" properly.  The point of the ice water is to keep the the steel from overheating to a temperature at which the strength will be significantly affected.  If you keep the spear on the grinder for too long then the tip will certainly become discolored and brittle.  I've found that by minimizing grinder time and cooling the tip frequently this can be avoided. This works for me.  The very fine point won't last just because of it's structure.  This is true even with a brand new spear.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 07, 2019, 04:21:20 PM
Maybe I'm not using the term "quench" properly.  The point of the ice water is to keep the the steel from overheating to a temperature at which the strength will be significantly affected.  If you keep the spear on the grinder for too long then the tip will certainly become discolored and brittle.  I've found that by minimizing grinder time and cooling the tip frequently this can be avoided. This works for me.  The very fine point won't last just because of it's structure.  This is true even with a brand new spear.

If you overheat the tip you will anneal it. If you quench carbon steel in ice water it will harden if you do it to 17ph it will make it brittle
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Kshang on September 07, 2019, 10:57:16 PM
I got myself a hand file and spent like 5-8 minutes on the RA tri-cut tip, and am pretty happy with the result.  I was recently watching YouTube videos and trying sharpening my knifes on a whetstone, and this speartip filing process is much easier in comparison. 

One thing I did was, other than following the angle of the original cut, I also created a steeper (less acute) angle close to the very tip, because I badly chipped the tip from my last dive, so I would otherwise have to grind off quite a bit of metal if I were to keep the original angle throughout.  I would think the idea would be similar to the (slight) difference between a rock-point tip and a strictly pencil-point tip, with the former having a second, less acute angle, cut at the very end of the tip.  This should make my ongoing maintenance a bit easier, and what I really need are the sharp edges between the three faces anyway and less a perfectly pointy tip. 

Echoing what another user said earlier in the string, I think this also enables you to sharpen the tip on the road (e.g., multi-day trip, liveaboard) when you don't have access to power tools in the shop (not to slight power tools such as a bench grinder though, which I would use if I had one handy). 
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 08, 2019, 11:33:36 PM
Maybe I'm not using the term "quench" properly.  The point of the ice water is to keep the the steel from overheating to a temperature at which the strength will be significantly affected.  If you keep the spear on the grinder for too long then the tip will certainly become discolored and brittle.  I've found that by minimizing grinder time and cooling the tip frequently this can be avoided. This works for me.  The very fine point won't last just because of it's structure.  This is true even with a brand new spear.

If you overheat the tip you will anneal it. If you quench carbon steel in ice water it will harden if you do it to 17ph it will make it brittle

It doesn't really matter if you use ice water or motor oil or 17ph unless you are actually trying to achieve a specific temper. Quenching hot steel in anything will not make it brittle unless the metal is at least glowing at a cherry red. Basically making a spear is similar to making a knife or an axe. you want the tip, or edge to be able to keep a sharp point but not break under normal use, and the rest of the steel should be a bit softer to absorb flex and impact. When forging metal, it is glowing hot. If left to air cool, the forged metal will be relatively pliable and won't break if bent when cold. It is "soft". If you "quench" steel when it is glowing red hot, the molecules will "crystalize" into a very hard, but very brittle state. This is "hardened" steel. But for most applications you do not want hardened steel because it will break before it bends and it will probably be harder than a typical file so trying to sharpen it with a file would be pointless (no pun intended) So tempering is the process of heating the metal carefully, finding the right balance between brittle, hard and soft for whatever application you need. But if you overheat your spear tip while sharpening it, you have softened it. If you over heat it to the point that it is glowing red and you quench it in any liquid while it is still glowing red, you will harden that part of the spear and it will be brittle. So ya, if you don't know how to not over heat it on a bench grinder or belt sander just get a high quality file and do it by hand.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: TheKeeneroo on September 09, 2019, 08:54:56 AM
I heard of a guy that once epoxied a golf ball at the end of his spear and shot fish in the face to "knock them out." I've also hunted with guys that literally never sharpen their spear. It's more like a #2 pencil before it has ever been sharpened. He chalked it up to laziness... Just makes me wonder how important razor sharp spears are for us NorCal hunters. I'm sure symmetry plays into long shots for accuracy, but when you're shooting ~3 feet or less, makes me wonder. I've only ever once had a spear not go through the full fish and flopper not deploy, and that's because I was single banded, "long" shot a pathos 60 against a 15# sheephead (which I shot just forward of the upper gill plate edge - a very thick part of the fish).
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 09, 2019, 09:57:17 PM
Funny timing for this topic. Last weekend I took a solid, straight  head shot to a 8 pound size cabezon. It was sitting on a rock and the spear went through the head and hit the rock. The fish went ballistic. I tried to grab it and shove the spear the rest the way through the head, but the fish took off. Pulling my spear back to reload, I saw the spear had snapped about 1" below the flopper. I also noticed that where the break was, half the metal looked like a clean break, half was obviously rusty. So there was definitely previous damage to the spear I did not notice.  *Inspect your spears often*

So then I grabbed my back-up gun out of my kayak. Found another cabezon about 6 pounds. Decided to line up my shot from behind the gill plate so the spear would go through the body and out the head to avoid hitting the rock. I took my time to get the right shot and hopefully not break the spear on my back-ip gun. The friggin' spear hit the fish hard but bounced off! Looking at he tip, it definitely was not very sharp. It also wasn't totally blunt, but I'm sure if it had a sharper tip it would have sliced through the cab's skin rater than glanced off of it.

Just my 2 cents


Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: MATT MATTISON on September 10, 2019, 01:04:26 PM
wow !!! this many replies and most action in a thread in a long time in a post about sharping spear tips hahahahahahahahaha

Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 10, 2019, 02:49:58 PM
Funny timing for this topic. Last weekend I took a solid, straight  head shot to a 8 pound size cabezon. It was sitting on a rock and the spear went through the head and hit the rock. The fish went ballistic. I tried to grab it and shove the spear the rest the way through the head, but the fish took off. Pulling my spear back to reload, I saw the spear had snapped about 1" below the flopper. I also noticed that where the break was, half the metal looked like a clean break, half was obviously rusty. So there was definitely previous damage to the spear I did not notice.  *Inspect your spears often*

So then I grabbed my back-up gun out of my kayak. Found another cabezon about 6 pounds. Decided to line up my shot from behind the gill plate so the spear would go through the body and out the head to avoid hitting the rock. I took my time to get the right shot and hopefully not break the spear on my back-ip gun. The friggin' spear hit the fish hard but bounced off! Looking at he tip, it definitely was not very sharp. It also wasn't totally blunt, but I'm sure if it had a sharper tip it would have sliced through the cab's skin rater than glanced off of it.

Just my 2 cents

If your spear broke when you shot a rock, do you know what causes that?  Brittleness.
When you inspected it and found rust, do you why? It had a stress fracture because it was brittle. Rapid quenching is PRECISELY what causes brittleness, and it doesn't have to be red hot. Temperature to aneal depends on the final hardening temperature. And if a shaft is only case hardened, when you grind the tip yuhave removed the hardened steel.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 10, 2019, 11:02:03 PM
Funny timing for this topic. Last weekend I took a solid, straight  head shot to a 8 pound size cabezon. It was sitting on a rock and the spear went through the head and hit the rock. The fish went ballistic. I tried to grab it and shove the spear the rest the way through the head, but the fish took off. Pulling my spear back to reload, I saw the spear had snapped about 1" below the flopper. I also noticed that where the break was, half the metal looked like a clean break, half was obviously rusty. So there was definitely previous damage to the spear I did not notice.  *Inspect your spears often*

So then I grabbed my back-up gun out of my kayak. Found another cabezon about 6 pounds. Decided to line up my shot from behind the gill plate so the spear would go through the body and out the head to avoid hitting the rock. I took my time to get the right shot and hopefully not break the spear on my back-ip gun. The friggin' spear hit the fish hard but bounced off! Looking at he tip, it definitely was not very sharp. It also wasn't totally blunt, but I'm sure if it had a sharper tip it would have sliced through the cab's skin rater than glanced off of it.

Just my 2 cents

If your spear broke when you shot a rock, do you know what causes that?  Brittleness.
When you inspected it and found rust, do you why? It had a stress fracture because it was brittle. Rapid quenching is PRECISELY what causes brittleness, and it doesn't have to be red hot. Temperature to aneal depends on the final hardening temperature. And if a shaft is only case hardened, when you grind the tip yuhave removed the hardened steel.

Rob, I love you brother. But I Know how to weld, forge blades, heat treat and anneal blades. I know about brittleness  and I know how to determine where a stress fracture may have started. The "stress fracture" was caused by hitting several rocks through ling and cabezon heads. With all due respect, your above comments are not accurate.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 10, 2019, 11:06:25 PM
 :D
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 11, 2019, 07:40:22 AM
:D

Maybe I’m wrong. I’m just a dumb millwright.

Well, off to the machine shop.

:)
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 11, 2019, 08:50:58 PM
And my spear broke about 2" from the tip, so that part of the spear never got hot from sharpening. It probably got "work hardened" by hitting rocks. But no part of the spear was hardened from quenching under heat.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: charlierobinton on September 11, 2019, 09:01:58 PM
Fancy steel working lingo aside, I find my spear tips stay sharper when I hand file them to a point rather than using the bench grinder. I think I have a habit of going for "razor sharp" with the bench grinder, but when I'm sharpening by hand I usually get bored and stop when it is just "sharp enough" lol. I feel like the "sharp enough" point holds up better when I shoot the shit out of rocks, which I love to do.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Sea-Monkey on September 11, 2019, 09:10:15 PM
At the risk of needlessly perpetuating this thread, has anyone heard of hardfacing a spear tip? May be too small to do, but if possible it should seriously extend tip life and reduce the need to sharpen so often.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 12, 2019, 03:55:22 AM
At the risk of needlessly perpetuating this thread, has anyone heard of hardfacing a spear tip? May be too small to do, but if possible it should seriously extend tip life and reduce the need to sharpen so often.

I’ve only hardfaced things with a lot of base material. Aqua-chisels for farming operations, rock crushers in a quarry, asphalt drums, things with a lot of parent metal. I’ve only used stick, but you can flux core or tig it on.  Only tig would be precise enough to build up something as small as a spear tip and not heat a large are or blow the tip off.  Then you would have to use a grinder to put a point or edge back on it.

It sounds good in theory but with such a small amount of parent metal and high amount of heat transfer in stainless, who knows. I wouldn't do it.  It's easier to run a file across it once a year.

Personally, I make it a habit not to shoot rocks.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: MATT MATTISON on September 12, 2019, 09:08:52 AM
 GRUMPY OLD MAN HAT ON !!! LOL  just WOW !!!! over complicating a simple topic !! we are shooting rock fish from a few feet away you could use a sharpened stick and a rubber band for gods sake, haven't any of you ever heard the term KISS ? strop over thinking it ! now if you were talking about $80-$100 slip tip then I would understand.



Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: brysny on September 12, 2019, 12:05:20 PM
Hmmm.  Matt you may be right about KISS, but then if I followed the principal of Keep It Simple Stupid, I would be walking 5 minutes to the grocery store and buying fish for dinner!  But that takes all the fun out of it.

So instead of KISS -- one of my thread on tips I chucked in the lathe, drilled a 1/8" hole in it and loctited in an 1/8" carbide pin.  Sharpened it up once and it has stayed super sharp AND lets me shoot lots of rocks  ;D
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: the_derek on September 12, 2019, 01:00:17 PM
Quote
Rob, I love you brother. But I Know how to weld, forge blades, heat treat and anneal blades. I know about brittleness  and I know how to determine where a stress fracture may have started. The "stress fracture" was caused by hitting several rocks through ling and cabezon heads. With all due respect, your above comments are not accurate.

anyone else read... anal beads...



probably just me  :-[
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Rob102 on September 12, 2019, 01:40:54 PM
:D

I just left the machine shop. My head machinist agrees with you Dan. He said you would have to hold the temperature for a long time to affect the temper, although it would be better to quench in oil than water.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: ddesideria on September 12, 2019, 02:46:46 PM
Still remember the reply from my friend's uncle back in the day (like 20 years ago).
When I asked why his spear was dull as finger, he explained that carp's scales (it was Ukraine, target species there was carp) are large and heavy armored, so the sharp tip will just pin to the middle of the scale and will try to push the whole thing through the fish's body, while dull one will just slip in between the scales easily without breaking one.
So I still keep his advice and never sharpen mine. Never had problems with penetration so far. Not being afraid to accidentally scratch anything with the sharp tip is an added bonus ;D
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Diver Dan on September 13, 2019, 09:38:08 PM
:D

I just left the machine shop. My head machinist agrees with you Dan. He said you would have to hold the temperature for a long time to affect the temper, although it would be better to quench in oil than water.

I think the lesson we can all take away from this long but entertaining thread is 1. your spears, if high quality should be tempered to the perfect hardness (no need to case harden them). 2. If you sharpen them on a belt sander or grinder, quench them every 1-2 seconds. 3. Probably best to sharpen with a high quality hand file (it has to be harder that the spear to sharpen it) 4. Avoid hitting rocks.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: ddesideria on September 13, 2019, 09:50:02 PM
4. Avoid hitting rocks.
I also heard that water (especially salty) causes corrosion of metal, so better to keep it out in the dry.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Malibu_Two on September 14, 2019, 02:46:22 PM
GRUMPY OLD MAN HAT ON !!! LOL  just WOW !!!! over complicating a simple topic !! we are shooting rock fish from a few feet away you could use a sharpened stick and a rubber band for gods sake, haven't any of you ever heard the term KISS ? strop over thinking it ! now if you were talking about $80-$100 slip tip then I would understand.

From the $400 open cell neoprene suits to precision made guns, pole spears, masks, etc, there is NOTHING simple about what we do. Lots of technology and science and money goes into free-diving gear. Might as well take care of it properly.
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: John on September 21, 2019, 01:00:13 PM
strop over thinking it !

Now dudes are stropping their tips?! Holy smokes, this IS getting deep!
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Kshang on September 22, 2019, 10:49:10 AM
strop over thinking it !

Now dudes are stropping their tips?! Holy smokes, this IS getting deep!

Fishing spear and sushi knife rolled into one.  This has the potential to become the Swiss army knife for the underwater world. 
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: MinnowHunter on September 26, 2019, 10:10:08 AM
I find water stones the most effective
Title: Re: Sharpening tri-cut tips?
Post by: Kshang on September 26, 2019, 12:54:46 PM
I find water stones the most effective

whetstone?  the sharp tip would probably make a dent in the stone once you are done, so it's probably fine if you have an old whetstone you don't intend to use for sharpening your knifes anymore, or if you have a whetstone dedicated to shaft tips.

Another point is to use a whetstone with coarse grits.  The 1,000+ grits would probably be too smooth for this purpose and can take much longer.